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Anthropology Related Talk

What Does Innocence Have to do with Justice?”

Dr. Miriam Ticktin. Associate Professor of Anthropology and Co-Director of Zolberg Center on Global Migration, the New School.  This talk is part of the Committee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series.  http://www.newschool.edu/nssr/faculty/?id=4d54-6379-4e44-4d35

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Location:
Young Library Auditorium
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Disrupting Life/Not Life: A Feminist-Indigenous Reading of Interspecies Relations and the New Materialisms

Dr. Kim TallBear is Associate Professor of Anthropology at University of Texas at Austin and a Fellow of James Voss-Texas Instruments Regents Professorship in Australian Studies.  Sponsored by the UK Political Ecology Working Group (DOPE), this talk begins with a critical reading of a particular set of human-on-human relations—those involved when scientists (disproportionately white Western men) sample indigenous peoples in the course of human genome research. Many of the bio-specimens in circulation today were taken from indigenous peoples’ bodies during earlier ethical and racial regimes. New bioethical responses are afoot. But when they emerge from non-indigenous institutions and philosophical terrain they cannot fully address indigenous peoples’ interpretations and ethical needs. I propose that indigenous responses to genome technologies and practices can be more fully understood not simply by recourse to “bioethics,” but also by weaving together the approaches of indigenous thinkers historically with newer thinking in indigenous studies, feminist science studies, political ecology, critical animal studies, and the new materialisms. This talk weaves into conversation diverse intellectual threads in order to help us understand how the lines between life and not life, materiality and the “sacred” are not so easily drawn for some indigenous peoples. This implicates how we approach from an indigenous standpoint the ethics of the preservation and new use of old biological samples. More fundamentally, this talk interrogates the underlying concept of “preservation” that emerges from non-indigenous institutions in the form of technological and policy practices. Such practices compartmentalize indigenous history, bodies, and landscapes into a historical before and after that undercuts the very idea of indigenous peoples and landscapes as fully alive today.

Date:
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Location:
Memorial Hall
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Third Wave Coffee, Maya Farmers, and the Anthropology of Wellbeing

His talk focuses on specialty coffee markets and Maya farmers in Guatemala. The best coffees these days are selling for astronomical prices and even though farmers are not getting rich, they are benefitting from the market boom and have high hopes for coffee. 

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Location:
Patterson Office Tower 18th floor West End Room
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Global Uttarakhand: Development, Neoliberalism and Social Justice in Himalayan India emnort0 Mon, 01/26/2015 - 08:52 am

The UK Appalachian Center welcomes Dr. Rebecca Klenk from the University of Tennessee Knoxville.  She will be giving a talk entitled Global Uttarakhand: Development, Neoliberalism and Social Justice in Himalayan India as a part of our Appalachian Forum Series on Civil Rights, Labor and Environmental Social Movements in Appalachia.  Her talk will be held in the Niles Gallery from 3:30 to 5 p.m. on Monday, March 9, 2015.  A reception will follow at the UK Appalachian Center from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Date:
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Location:
Niles Gallery
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“Perspectives On Nations Unbound: The Transnational Paradigm in the Current Conjecture”

Held in conjunction with ST 600, "Transnational Lives," Dr. Glick Schiller is the first lecturer in the Commitee on Social Theory Spring Lecture Series. 

Date:
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Location:
18th Floor of Patterson Office Tower
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